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JumpStart 2019
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First Day of School
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Convocation
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6th Grade Coffee
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ES Parent Information Night
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Classrooms
HS Parent Information Night
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HS Retreat 2019
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Seniors leave for HS Retreat
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7th Grade Coffee
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HS Retreat 2019
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HS Retreat 2019
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Labor Day
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MS Parent Information Night
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8th Grade Coffee
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9th Grade Parent Coffee
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10th Grade Parent Coffee
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6th Grade Camp Highland
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MS Retreat
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6th Grade Camp Highland
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7th Grade Camp Highland
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Class and Individual Picture Day
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MS Retreat
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7th Grade Camp Highland
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8th Grade Camp Highland
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MS Retreat
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8th Grade Camp Highland
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MS Retreat
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8th Grade Camp Highland
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MS Retreat
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Jr. Beta Inductions
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Studio 86
Senior Parent Meeting
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ES Fall Festival
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HS Turf Field
5th Grade Space Camp
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5th Grade Space Camp
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5th Grade Space Camp
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Fall Break
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Fall Break
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Fall Break
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Program Studies

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Mission

Fellowship Christian School faculty and staff strive to incorporate Biblical teaching into all curriculum areas and extra-curricular activities. Careful consideration is given to the selection of text and supporting material. Textbooks include Christian and secular texts.

Semester Credits

Students enroll in courses on a semester basis and earn one 1/2 credit per semester for successful completion of a course. Advanced Placement and Honors classes are offered to students in grades 9-12, and students are encouraged to take these classes in keeping with our college preparatory curriculum.

Schedule

The school day consists of seven class periods.

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday
8:00 - 3:12

Wednesday
9:00 - 3:12

BIBLE

BIBLE

*These are potential course offerings that will depend on schedule and faculty availability.

 

OT: Unbroken Foundations (9th and 10th Grade)

Where did it all begin? How did it come to be? Come explore the Pentateuch to discover the beginnings of our faith and become acquainted with God in His relentless pursuit of His people.

 

OT: Portraits from the Old Testament (9th and 10th Grade)

This course is designed to expose students to the major themes, characters, events and places that are found in the Old Testament. Students will witness the sovereignty of God in the unfolding and interaction of these characters and events. Relevance will be found in the application of truth for today’s student. Units of study will include creation, the Patriarchs, the Judges, the Kings as well as the single and divided kingdoms.

 

NT: Lessons from the life of Christ (9th and 10th Grade)

This course is designed to expose students to the major themes, characters, events and places found in the New Testament, in particular, the life of Jesus Christ. Students will witness the sovereignty of God in the unfolding and interaction of these characters and events. Relevance will be found in the application of truth for today’s student. Units of study will include Christ’s character, example, major experiences, His friends and enemies, parables, miracles and the Sermon on the Mount.

 

NT: Urgent Writings of the New Testament (9th and 10th Grade)

Faced with persecution and tasked with creating a new perspective of God and the world, the New Testament writers penned the letters that would become the basis of Christianity. Come explore their writings and experience the timeless relevance of the New Testament letters.

 

Answering Questions/Questioning Answers (11th and 12th Grade)

This course is designed to help students understand the major objections to the Christian faith, and provide them with the answers to effectively defend that faith. Students will be introduced to classic, as well as current defenses of the Christian faith. Students will also be encouraged to examine which methods of dialogue are not only the most persuasive, but also the most biblical. Relevance will be found in preparing to enter a culture (college, workplace, social media) that is hostile to Christianity. Units of study will include scientific objections (existence of God, science has disproven Christianity), historical objections (reliability of scripture, historical Jesus), and moral objections (Crusades, judgmental or hypocritical Christians).

 

Art and the Gospel (11th and 12th Grade)

Art impacts the soul. You’ve heard, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” Artwork throughout history has captured what the culture values. This course considers how truth, the Gospel, and aspects of a Biblical worldview have reoccurred throughout the imagery and scope of Art history. Students will observe numerous artworks, examine the power and influence of artwork on its audience, and its impact over the centuries. Erwin McManus said in The Artisan Soul, “God created us to create and imagined us to imagine.” This truth will resonate and reverberate throughout the artwork considered.

 

Christian Leadership (11th and 12th Grade)

What is Christian leadership? Who is a leader? This class will enable students to answer questions through the leadership vision of Jesus.

Objectives:

1. The Art of Leadership

  • Theology of Leadership
  • Background
  • Servant Leadership
  • Situational Leadership
  • Examples of Jesus
  • Spiritual Formation as Leadership
  • Mentoring
  • Fellowship

2. Communication

  • The Process
  • Listening
  • Direct -v- Non Direct

3. Team Leadership

  • Dysfunctions
  • Diversity
  • Effective Teams

4. The Price of Leadership

  • Pastoral Life
  • Traveling the Journey

 

How to deal with...whatever… (11th and 12th Grade)

(Real World Moral/Ethical Dilemmas)

This class is a problem. Actually, it’s many problems. We will present and discuss and ultimately resolve many problems that students encounter today. Through collaboration and design thinking, using the bible and other biblical texts, students will explore common and not so common dilemmas through the lens of both a Christian worldview as well as other prevalent worldviews to have a realistic idea of the validity of choices that they may make in the future.

 

Worldview/Missions (11th and 12th Grade)

Though the United States represents less that 5% of the world’s population, we consume about 25% of the world’s resources and represent about 25% of the world’s Christians. What responsibility do we have to the other 95%? In this course we will 1) work on developing a Christian perspective of the whole world, 2) examine other cultures and belief systems, 3) examining best missions practices around the world including techniques for sharing your faith, house churches, cell groups, etc. and 4) take a special look at the persecuted church.

 

W.S.C.D.? - What Should Christians Do? (11th and 12th Grade)

This course is designed to equip students to articulate a loving, Christ-like response to current world/national/local events. Students will be encouraged to investigate and evaluate current Christian thinking on issues on blogs, websites, and magazines. Students will also be exposed to historical Christian thinking on responding to issues in the world. Relevance will be found in giving students a practical place to see the importance of working out their response to issues on a day to day basis. Units will be based on what events or issues are taking place.

 

World Religion (11th and 12th Grade)

A study of comparisons and contrasts between selected areas of Christian theology and contemporary world religious thought, with a view toward understanding other religions and effectively communicating the gospel message.

Objectives

1. Students will be conversant regarding the basic theological content and selected practices of the major world religions. Video presentations, guest lecturers, site visitations, as- signed readings, and class discussions are designed so that students gain familiar- ity with and capability relating to those of non-Christian beliefs and customs.

2. Class Participants will compare and contrast Christian truth with selected beliefs and practices of other world religions. The course will compare responses by the world religions to universal questions, and evaluate these responses from a Trinitarian perspective.

3. Students will focus on a single world religion of their choice developing a theological and missiological strategy for communicating the gospel to its adherents. The student will integrate class content and personal research in a written presentation concerning a major non-Christian religion’s primary beliefs, barriers, and bridges to Christian faith and how best to make understandable the gospel.

4. Student will have opportunity develop bridges of friendship and dialogue with a person or family of a non-Christian religion by showing compassion in a demonstrable form. Doing good works—not abstractly but by personal caring toward a particular non- Christian religionist—is an integral part of Christian witness.

 

Biblical Peer Leadership (12th Grade)

This course is for seniors dedicated to relationship and community building within the Fellowship community and will build a bridge between ages and divisions through mentoring, leadership, and service. Students will learn how to use their own lives to lead others, through intensive leadership training, discipleship development, and peer mentoring sessions. This class has a limited size with an application process that includes a class application, teacher recommendations and a panel review.

 

Wonderfully Made (12th Grade Girls)

The purpose of this class is to provide a safe space for young women to examine their faith, ask questions, and be authentic as they take a step forward in discovering their identity in Christ. So much gets in the way of students having a solid grasp on who they truly are. This class will guide them toward identifying themselves as a daughter of God. The teacher will help the students discover the distorted messages they may believe and guide them to learning how the Truth counteracts those lies, helping define who they are. It is intended to be an interactive, discussion-based class where the teacher will guide the students to make connections between scripture, knowing the real Truth, and how to apply it in their own personal lives.

ENGLISH

Introduction to Literature/Introduction to Literature Honors (9th Grade)

 

This course is designed to introduce students to various literary genres, basic grammar, essential composition skills and techniques, SAT preparation, and several significant works of literature.  The student explores a variety of literary works including novels, plays, poetry, essays, and short stories such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Romeo and Juliet, Lord of the Flies and more. Texts are selected from various literary movements and time periods that challenge students in critical and analytical thinking as well as real world associations. Students will also learn grammatical structure, rules, and applications, as well as composition techniques, style development and refinement, vocabulary, test-taking skills, and literary terminology.  

 

Honors Introduction to Literature will challenge students toward greater independent agency and critical and analytical thinking while interacting with text, typically furthered through student-driven in-depth discussions and activities. The honors student can expect increased writing opportunities and more rigorous writing assignments, incorporating critical thinking and proficiency in rhetoric.  In addition, writing assignments at the honors level are graded more rigorously, fostering proficiency.

 

World Literature/World Literature Honors (10th Grade)

This course is designed to introduce students to different cultures, including the Far East, Ancient Greece, Africa, India and Persia, and others, through the lens of diverse literary works, such as Asian poetry, Dante’s Inferno, Macbeth, and more.  Students will examine cultural aspects of worldview, history, and societal customs while reading literary texts of multiple genres such as dramatic tragedy, modern poetry, various novels and nonfiction.  Students will also learn grammatical structure, rules, and applications, as well as composition techniques, style development and refinement, vocabulary, test-taking skills, and literary terminology.  

 

Honors World Literature will challenge students toward greater independent agency and critical and analytical thinking while interacting with text, typically furthered through student-driven in-depth discussions and activities. The honors student can expect increased writing opportunities and more rigorous writing assignments, incorporating critical thinking and proficiency in rhetoric.  In addition, writing assignments at the honors level are graded more rigorously, fostering proficiency and encouraging mastery.

 

American Literature/American Literature Honors (11th Grade)

 

This survey course introduces students to significant American writers and literary works from each major time period, beginning with the colonial period and continuing to contemporary literature.  Students study various types of literature, including novels, drama, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction, and focus on essential thematic threads such as the American dream, historical connections, and real world connections to worldview and the value of the individual.  Grammar practice and application, style techniques, and general composition strategies are also taught and practiced.  Students will write many essays, critiques, summaries, and a major research paper.  SAT preparation is also a component of the course.

 

Honors American Literature will require increased independent agency and critical and analytical thinking while interacting with text, typically furthered through student-driven in-depth discussions, activities, and writing. The honors student can expect increased writing opportunities and more rigorous writing assignments, incorporating critical thinking and proficiency in rhetoric.  In addition, writing assignments at the honors level are graded more rigorously, fostering proficiency and encouraging mastery.

 

AP English: Language and Composition (11th Grade)

 

This course introduces the student to logic, rhetoric, analysis, argumentation, and American literature through a survey of significant literary works from each major time period, beginning with the colonial period and continuing to contemporary literature.  Various types of literature are represented, including novels, drama, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction.  Literature is discussed and analyzed at a high level, and pertinent terminology is also reinforced.  Grammar practice and application, style techniques, and composition strategies are taught and practiced.  The student writes many essays, critiques, and timed essays, in addition to a major literary criticism research paper.  SAT preparation is also a component of the course.

 

British Literature/British Literature Honors (12th Grade)

 

This survey course introduces the student to classic British literary works such as Frankenstein, the Anglo-Saxon epic, Beowulf, Jane Eyre, Hamlet, and more, utilizing thematic units such as “Heroes and Monsters”, “Voices of the Marginalized”, and “Storytelling and the Short Story”.  Students will thematically interact with major works and periods of British literature, including the Arthurian legends, various medieval literature, 16th and 19th century English poetry, Renaissance drama, novel, short stories, and selected non-fiction. Grammatical structure, rules and application, style techniques, and composition strategies are also taught and practiced in conjunction with students writing numerous essays, critiques, and summaries, and a major research paper.  SAT preparation is a component, and the student learns, and applies vocabulary, usage rules and conventions, critical reading and test-taking strategies, and writing skills.

 

Honors British Literature will require increased independent agency and high level critical and analytical thinking while interacting with text, typically furthered through student-driven in-depth discussions, activities, and writing. The honors student can expect increased writing opportunities and more rigorous writing assignments, incorporating critical thinking and proficiency in rhetoric.  In addition, writing assignments at the honors level are graded more rigorously in pursuit of mastery.

 

AP/Dual Enrollment English: Literature and Composition (12th Grade)

 

This course is designed to equip students to write proficiently and think critically and analytically.  The tangible goal of the course is the successful completion of the international exam given in May of each year; however, the most important goal of the class is to produce excellent thinkers and communicators who will be lifelong learners.  The content of the course is not comprised of a set of finite facts; rather it is an exercise in verbal problem-solving, requiring a broad base of knowledge and challenging students to respond at the highest levels of application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.  During the course, the student studies some of the finest works of British literature, including The Importance of Being Earnest, Hamlet, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Pride and Prejudice as well as expanding their understanding of texts beyond British Literature through monthly independent reading.  The student also writes extensively at a college level, learns and applies literary techniques and terms, develops test-taking skills, and discerns biblical truth more clearly.

 

FINE ARTS

Introduction to Art: (One Semester)

This course is designed to inspire the creativity of students wanting to earn their HS Fine Arts credit. Various art movements and styles will be explored, while experimenting with materials in painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media, and sculpture.  

 

Advanced Painting: (One Semester)

A course designed for Artisan students wanting to work on portfolio pieces for AP Art, as well as students who have met the pre-requisite requirements of submitting a portfolio to the Fine Arts Dept. and have completed one year of Intro to Art. Students will be guided through independent work, and critiques. Instruction includes how to create a successful composition and concept, color theory, painting styles, techniques and materials.  

 

Advanced Drawing: (One Semester)

An intensive course designed for Artisan students working on portfolio pieces for AP Art. This course is also open to focused students desiring to draw who meet the pre-requisite requirements of a portfolio review with the Fine Arts Dept. and have completed one year of Intro to Art. Drawing students will engage in life drawing, honing their skills in mastering various drawing mediums to render realistic forms. Students will also explore personal expression and concept through independent work, critiques and individualized instruction.  

 

Advanced 3-D/Sculpture: (One Semester)

A course for Artisan students, as well as those interested in exploring sculpture who have completed one year of Intro to Art. Students will create three-dimensional form using a variety of materials, such as paper mache, wire, clay, wood, and more. Students will learn how to manipulate materials, and safety with equipment in applying the elements and principles of art to sculptural forms.  

 

AP Studio Art

The Advanced Placement course is for students exploring and experimenting in drawing or painting at an advanced level and is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed the Pre-AP Studio Art course or have a qualified portfolio.  This class is designed to meet the requirements of the College Board AP Art class and will result in a portfolio submittal.  Students who score highly on the portfolio review may be eligible for college credit.

 

AP Art 3D

This Advanced Placement course is for students exploring and experimenting in three dimensional arts at an advanced level and is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed the Pre-AP Studio/3D Art course or who have a qualified portfolio. This class is designed to meet the requirements of the College Board AP Art Class and will result in a portfolio submittal. Students who score highly on the portfolio review may be eligible for college credit.

 

Introduction to Photography: (One Semester)

This is an intro-level class open to any student needing credit.

The class will provide students with a basic introduction into digital cameras and digital editing. Having use of a digital SLR camera is a requirement of this class, as the majority of the lessons will include instruction with regards to the SLR functions.  

 

Introduction to Illustrator: (One Semester)

This is an intro-level class open to any student needing credit.

Students will learn the basics of Adobe Illustrator and graphic design. Most projects will be turned in digitally, with one or two actually going to print. No prerequisite class is required.

 

Advanced Photo Methods: (One Semester)

This course is designed for students in the Artisan Track (Visual Arts Pathway), but is open to students desiring a “next level” art class. Students will learn advanced photography and editing skills. Instruction will include both digital and traditional dark room work. Students are required to have usage of a digital SLR camera for the course. The program may be able to provide some 35mm film cameras for check out, but students will be required to purchase their own film and paper (per instructor parameters).

 

Advanced Graphic Design: (One Semester)

This course is designed for students in the Artisan Track (Visual Arts Pathway), but is open to students desiring a “next level” art class. Students will receive instruction in both traditional and digital forms of graphic design (Adobe Illustrator, colored pencil, ink, marker, and screen printing). Projects may range from greeting cards, movie posters, and digital advertisements. Some personal supplies will be needed for this course

 

AP 2D/Photography

This course is designed to assist advanced photography students in the creation of their AP Portfolio. Students are encouraged to do 75-80% of the required work off campus, relying on the classroom setting for collaboration, brainstorming, and editing. The collective work will demonstrate the process of art, whereas each artist should show growth in their mastery of technique, understanding of design, and creation of personal voice. At the end of the Academic year AP students will turn in a 24-piece portfolio to the College Board for review.

 

Creative Writing

Encountering a piece of quality writing has the potential to affect us profoundly. It can inspire us, move us, challenge us, and even transform us. For you, perhaps that piece was a magnificent novel or a sublime poem. Maybe it was powerful play or a compelling essay. Regardless of genre, what is certain is that within the tapestry of words the author wove their God-given creativity. Indeed, writing of any kind is a beautifully creative process.

In the Creative Writing course at Fellowship, students will have the opportunity to wade into the wide ocean that is writing. Multiple genres and styles will be explored and experimented with—from fiction, to poetry, to drama, and journalism. The goal of the course is for students hone their skills and build on their passion—all the while serving one another in their pursuit through critical and collaboratively constructive feedback.

 

Music Theory & Composition

We musicians like to say that if you can’t read and write music, you’re only 50% literate. This course will begin with a crash course (four to six weeks) on how to read and write music, followed by a music theory and composition course. We will be writing lyrics, composing music, learning harmony, studying form, arranging music and hopefully presenting an end of year concert of the best works produced during the year. Along the way, we’ll look at the technological tools of the trade and how to get something published.

Advanced Music Theory

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop, practice and master music theory and ear training skills essential for success in post-secondary course work. In most college music programs, freshman music theory is the "weed-out" course for those who should not be majoring in music. Students who take this course will find themselves significantly ahead of their peers and well positioned for success on the college level.

 

Drama I  

This course will explore and build upon the fundamentals of stage performance.  Students can expect to engage in monologues, dialogues, small group numbers, and scenes from upcoming productions.  

 

Set Design/Construction  

Students will help design and build props, sets, and scenes for all levels of performance at Fellowship including elementary, middle, and high school performances.  

 

Advanced Stage

Students will work with stylized scene work, period acting, dance/movement sequences, and fight choreography.  Students will also help set scene work for upcoming productions.  

 

Advanced Film  

Acting will focus on acting for the camera - a practice which is completely different from acting on stage. Students will be utilized in the filming of various in-school projects and ultimately create their own reel.

 

Video Production

Video Production will teach students the creative and technical skills to produce quality videos.  Topics include directing, producing, writing, using cameras & lenses, storyboarding, budgeting, lighting, and editing for promotional videos, storytelling videos, and short film format.

 

Paladin Productions

(Requires showing up to school early on specific days and occasionally filming outside of the classroom and after school.)

The age of radio has long since passed us by as we are now in the Golden Age of Television. Come join Paladin Productions and participate in a year-long course that will explore every facet of television production in our new studio! From learning how news broadcasts, sitcoms, and television dramas are made to the specifics of operating a camera, setting up lighting, getting perfect audio, and appearing on screen, you will leave this class with a robust skill set useful for your own filming adventures or marketable for future jobs. Throughout the year, you will help run morning announcements as a live-television broadcast to the whole school. Additionally, you will film and edit promotional materials for chapel, varsity sports, clubs, and special events. Whether you wish to become the next great on-air personality or grip extraordinaire, Paladin Productions has a place for you!

Yearbook

Students participate in the total preparation of the school yearbook, from deciding the theme, layout and design, photography and reporting, and editing, to final proofreading and approval.  Students who return to yearbook and/or demonstrate exceptional desire and skill may apply for editing positions (editor-in-chief, design editor, copy editor, and photo editor).  

 

Chamber Singers (Before School/1 day a week)

This course will help students develop and enlarge their vocal and performance skills by learning and performing multi-part vocal presentations, including concerts, special school presentations, musical theater, and various competitions throughout the region.

 

MATH

General Honors and On-Level Departmental Distinctions for Math:

Honors and on-level math courses at Fellowship are differentiated in their depth and breadth of content as well as in their assessments and planned instructional time.  In general, on-level students receive more teacher-led examples and practice while the lessons are being taught, while honors students are expected to apply the concepts and procedures they learn more independently.    

In addition, the honors student can expect an increased rigor of assessments.  Across the board, all students learn and work towards mastery of solving application and critical thinking questions appropriate for their level of course, yet more of these types of questions are regularly assessed in honors courses as compared to on-level.   

 

Algebra I/Algebra I Honors

This comprehensive program allows students to develop a solid foundation in basic Algebra skills.  Students will explore families of functions; specifically linear, quadratic and exponential functions.  They will learn to represent functions as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. Students will also learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems.  Students will also explore radical expressions, as well as units in data analysis and probability.  Through learning these concepts, students are taught to appreciate the orderliness and precision that God has made and ordained.

 

Geometry/Honors Geometry

Students learn definitions and/or facts to solve problems involving geometric figures, congruent triangles, similar triangles, parallel lines, circumference, area, volume, and right triangle trigonometry.  They are introduced to formal logic and mathematical proofs, and they will study probability and data analysis.  They will investigate the consistency of mathematical truths in the world around them and learn practical applications of algebraic concepts to geometric models.  Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness and precision of God.   

 

Algebra II

This course reviews and extends concepts and skills from both Algebra I and geometry. Students apply methods of probability and data analysis to advanced statistics topics and expand their understanding of functions to polynomials, rationals, radicals, and quadratics. In addition, conic sections, logarithms, and complex numbers are also introduced, which gives students a solid foundation to understand principles in science-related fields and business.  Through learning these concepts, students are taught to appreciate the orderliness and precision that God has made and ordained.

 

Dual Enrollment/ Honors Algebra II (College Algebra)

This course reviews and extends concepts and skills from both Algebra I and geometry. Students apply methods of probability and data analysis to advanced statistics topics and expand their understanding of functions to polynomials, rationals, radicals, and quadratics. In addition, conic sections, logarithms, and complex numbers are also introduced, which gives students a solid foundation to understand principles in science-related fields and business.  Through learning these concepts, students are taught to appreciate the orderliness and precision that God has made and ordained.  Sophomores, juniors and seniors will get a college math credit for College Algebra. By taking this course students will see that the time and effort they invest pays off in the end as they will be fully equipped for pre-calculus. They will also become more familiar with the rigor that comes with higher-level math classes.


 

Pre-Calculus

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for college level mathematics or Calculus.   The fall semester of this course is primarily dedicated to the study of Trigonometry beyond right triangles.  Students study the Unit circle, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, and trigonometric function applications.  In the second semester, students learn advanced algebra-based topics that commonly occur in physics, statistics, and college level math courses. These topics include matrices, conic sections, vectors, and statistical reasoning.  Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness and precision of God.  This class is a prerequisite to AP Calculus.

 

 

Dual Enrollment Accelerated (Honors) Pre-Calculus

Accelerated Pre-Calculus is an introductory, college-level dual enrollment course.  This course prepares students for calculus, and it includes an intensive study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum/minimum problems, exponential growth, decay, and surveying problems. Pre-Calculus, like all other branches of mathematics, is a true gift from God that dictates the order in our world.  Every mathematical task has a purpose and place that illustrates the intricacies of God’s creation, and evidence of this fact is woven throughout the entire fabric of the Accelerated Pre-Calculus course.


 

AP Calculus AB

The course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB examination which, if passed with a sufficient score, grants college Mathematics credit at most colleges and universities. Calculus AB is a course in introductory calculus with elementary functions and covers the following topics; functions and graphs, limits, continuity, differential calculus, and integral calculus. Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness, precision, and dependability of God.  Students enrolled in this course must take the AP course exam in the spring.  Students may apply to this course after successfully completing Pre-Calculus.  Please follow the FCS AP application process to be admitted into this course.   

 

 

AP Calculus BC

The course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus BC Examination which, if passed with a sufficient score, grants college Mathematics credit at most colleges and universities. At FCS, Calculus BC is a continuation of the AB Course (not an enhancement). The scope of the course covers a thorough review of the AB Calculus topics, as well as new BC content, which may include but is not limited to the topics of sequences and series, improper integrals, parametric function calculus, vectors, and polar function applications. Students enrolled in this course must take the AP course exam in the spring.  Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness, precision, and dependability of God.  Students may apply to this course after successfully completing AP Calculus AB.  Please follow the FCS AP application process to be admitted into this course.   

 

Dual Enrollment Statistics

The Dual Enrollment Statistics course will give students experience with analyzing, summarizing, and interpreting statistical information and will also involve the  study of frequency distributions and graphical representations, measures of central tendency and variation, correlation, sampling, probability theory, and the normal and binomial distributions.   In this course, students will make sense of authentic problems and persevere in solving them. They will reason abstractly and quantitatively while communicating mathematics to others.  Additionally, students will use an array of technology tools, including a graphing calculator and Excel, to model mathematical situations, and they will also learn practical applications of algebraic and statistical concepts. Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness, precision, and dependability of God.  Students may apply for this course after successful completion of Pre-Calculus or higher.  There are no grade requirements, and only seniors are eligible.    

 

AP Statistics

The AP Statistics course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

1.       Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns

2.       Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study

3.       Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation

4.       Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

Throughout the course, students will explore the consistency of mathematical truths that demonstrate the orderliness, precision, and dependability of God.  Students may apply for this course after successful completion of Honors Algebra II or higher. Please refer to the math placement flow chart for more details concerning eligibility requirements.

 

SCIENCE

Biology/Biology Honors

This course is a study of living organisms, emphasizing structure, functions, and mechanisms, which unify the living world; and a survey of phylogenic distinctions which diversify the living world.  A comparative analysis of origins is conducted utilizing resources supporting creation and evolution science; the philosophical foundation of each is evaluated.  Extensive lab work and dissection of plant and animal life accompany this course.  The position of the school and personal belief of the instructor maintain the reliability of the Biblical account of origins as the foundation for all biological study.  

 

Physical Science

Physical Science is the study of matter and energy and their interactions. This course incorporates extensive laboratory experiences to demonstrate the principles taught. One semester introduces basic chemistry; the other is an introduction to physics.

 

Chemistry/Chemistry Honors

This course is a study of matter and its interaction at the atomic and molecular level.  Problem solving using chemical formulas is emphasized and modern atomic theory is covered in depth.  Chemistry labs are conducted regularly to apply the theories discussed in lecture and to further develop critical thinking skills.

 

Conceptual Physics

In Conceptual Physics, students learn essential concepts of physics through demonstrations, laboratory work, and discussion.  Careful gathering and analysis of quantitative data is stressed.  Some of the topics covered in this course are mechanics, electricity and magnetism, sound, and light. Math recommendation is completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry.

 

Dual Enrollment Physics  

This course is a study of matter and energy through the four traditional divisions of physics:  mechanics and heat, electricity, waves, and nuclear physics, with an emphasis on rigorous problem solving.  Lab work is included along with demonstrations by the instructor.  Math recommendation is completion of Algebra 2, enrolled in Pre-Calculus Honors.

 

Anatomy Honors

This course is a detailed study providing knowledge of anatomical terms and understanding of physiological processes.  Structure and function at each level (cell-tissue-organ-system) is studied.  Integration of systems is emphasized.  Careers in the medical and allied health fields are explored.  Lab activities include a large mammal dissection and dissection of mammal organs.   

 

Forensics

This class is designed for those students who already have an interest in forensic science and would like to take their interest one step further by learning about this subject in more detail. This course is a two semester course, and we will have a broad overview of the topic, while delving into selected portions of the text in greater detail. Hopefully this course will answer questions for those students who are thinking about possibly pursuing the study of forensic science in college, and will pique the interest of the rest of the students.

 

AP Chemistry  

AP Chemistry is equivalent to the first year chemistry class at a college or university for a student who will either major in chemistry, biology or biochemistry, or will complete the pre-medical sequence of courses to prepare for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT).  This is a mathematically rigorous course that builds upon the first year chemistry class that all students must take at Fellowship.  

 

AP Biology

AP Biology provides an in-depth study of cellular physiology, taxonomy, botany, zoology, and genetics, including recombinant DNA and population genetics.  The course includes extensive laboratory work.  Students develop analytical and organizational skills in written expression on the subject matter.  This course is intended to prepare students for the AP exam and is equivalent to the first year Biology class at a college or university.

 

AP Physics C – Mechanics  

The Physics C: Mechanics course is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course. It is especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.

 

AP Physics C – Electricity and Magnetism

The Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism course is a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Sociology Honors (9th Grade)

The Sociology elective is focused on the study of human behavior as it relates to society.  Students will gain an understanding of the development, organization, and value of local institutions; this would include such topics as the family, church, and school, while also incorporating broader social institutions such as economies, governments, political/social groups, and international organizations.  Within this study will be serious discussions regarding many of the social problems which burden modern societies.  Because this course is based on the authority of God's Word, students will gain a greater understanding of what role we have in society and what impact society should have on us.  This course is also designed to be a prerequisite to Honors or AP World History; as such, special emphasis will be given to critical reading, critical writing, and effective articulation.

 

World History/World History Honors (10th Grade)

The primary goal of this course is to instill in students an appreciation and understanding of the Biblical principles of authority, law, development of nations, consequences of national policies, and the role of history in the unfolding process of God’s plan. To achieve this goal, students will read, write, articulate, and think critically about vital issues in a global experience in the context of a Christian worldview. Students will learn the pivotal events, key personalities, great movements, and important developments in world history.

 

AP World History (10th Grade)

The AP World History course is a college-level course that is focused on understanding the development and diversity of a variety of human societies throughout history. Students will learn the pivotal events, key personalities, and great movements of world history in preparation for the AP test in the spring.  To that end, students will develop greater skills in critical reading, writing, and speaking throughout the year.  Special attention and emphasis is given to the centrality of God's Word and His guiding impact on the development of world events.   

 

U.S. History

The U.S. History course begins with the exploration and discovery of the New World and continues through the key themes of freedom, growth, equality, and global leadership.  Students develop college preparatory skills in critical reading, writing, and speaking while also developing a sense of biblically-based discernment.

 

U.S. History Honors/Dual Enrollment  (11th Grade)

U.S. History Honors/DE is an accelerated, college-level, dual enrollment course.  This course is designed to make students more aware of the origins and development of the United States through the study of the past.  Since this is a survey course, students will, through lectures, class discussions and the assigned readings, focus on the key ideas and broad themes throughout US History.  Students will learn not only facts, i.e., dates and names, but perhaps more importantly, they will learn how to evaluate and interpret those facts. Students will gain an increased knowledge of America’s history, understand how current events are shaped by past experience, improve knowledge of geography, improve reading comprehension skills, improve analytical skills, and improve written communication skills.

 

AP U.S. History (11th Grade)

The primary goal of the AP US History course is to instill in students an appreciation and understanding of what it means to be both an American and a Christian living in America.  To achieve this goal, students will read, write, articulate, and think critically at a college level about vital issues in the American experience--all in the context of a Christian worldview.  Students will master the complexity of the pivotal events, key personalities, great movements, and important developments in American history from the early European explorations through the 2008 Presidential election.  

 

In addition, students will work toward preparation for the AP exam (in May) by practicing test-taking strategies, extensive readings, extensive writing and copious note taking.

 

Economics (12th grade)

This one-semester course is designed to provide students with an introduction to both microeconomics (the study of economics applied to individuals and organizations) and macroeconomics (the study of economics applied to nations).  This course presents the basic concepts of economics in a practical manner through numerous real life applications and case studies, exposing students to both the theory and practice of economics.  

 

US Government (12th grade, One Semester)

This senior-level one semester course will survey key aspects of the U.S. government, including the roots of American government, the Constitution, the three branches of government, and citizenship issues.  Emphasis will be given to the analysis and application of information in order that students may have a better understanding of current events and become more competent and active citizens.  

 

AP United States Government (12th grade, Full Year)

This course conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics examination in May.  Topics for the course include: federalism, separation of powers, formation and adoption of the Constitution, political beliefs, political parties, elections, interest groups, institutions and policy processes, civil liberties, and civil rights.

 

AP Psychology (12 grade)

This course will introduce students to the concepts, approaches, and scientific study of human behavior and mental process. Students will learn critical thinking and use developed problem solving as they examine the natural science paradigm. A survey of psychological history, major theorists, and movements will enable students to better understand modern trends, facts, methods, and ethics. Students will explore the variety of modern psychology vocations and the many subfields, encouraging them to utilize and incorporate the knowledge of behavior and mental process in their daily lives.  

 

SPANISH

Spanish I  

One of the main goals of this course is to give students a positive and confident attitude towards learning a foreign language. The content of Spanish I focuses on teaching and understanding the culture of the target language by applying the fundamentals of the language, including proper pronunciation, building a vocabulary base, and mastering the patterns of commonly used present and past verb tenses, including commonly used irregular verbs, and verbs that have special uses. Students are not only expected to learn to understand the language, but more importantly, to produce the language, both orally and in writing, on a daily basis. Foreign language is a skill class, and, therefore, must be put into practice regularly to achieve any degree of fluency. A relaxed and accepting atmosphere helps students overcome anxiety about beginning to use unfamiliar language. Students will learn Bible verses using the Spanish Bible.

 

Spanish II/Spanish II Honors

This course is designed to give students novice-mid to novice-high level proficiency in Spanish through a comprehensive approach to language.  The course is a continuation of first year studies.  Instruction will be skill based and focused on the acquisition of language through speaking, reading, writing, listening and culture. Students in Spanish II add new vocabulary and review and build upon grammar learned in Spanish I. The culture of Spanish speaking countries is explored through research projects, technology and presentations.  The plan of salvation is taught using an Evangecube and Bible verses.

 

PreAP/Spanish III Honors

The Spanish III Honors course is a challenging class which stretches the student’s vocabulary, grammar and usage of the language through more complex reading, writing, listening, speaking and cultural exploration in a scaffold progression. The culture of Spanish speaking countries is explored through literature, media, research projects, technology and presentations. The Spanish Bible is provided and used for marking and sharing the plan of salvation, scripture memorization and Bible drills. This course will be introducing the students to the AP Spanish Language and Culture class.  This course is a Pre-AP Spanish Language and Culture.

 

AP Spanish

This course will emphasize the usage of the language in “real-life” situations as well as understanding and being understood by others, using interpretive, interpersonal and presentational skills. This course will engage students in an exploration of culture in both historical and contemporary contexts and create student awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., books, tools, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions). This course includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught in Spanish. The Spanish Bible is used as part of each lesson.

TECHNOLOGY/STEM

TECHNOLOGY/STEM

(Non-STEM students may take as electives if there is space after STEM students register)

 

Digital Design (One Semester)

Digital Design introduces students to the design process using digital media.  This one-semester course is geared toward developing artistic skills and computer skills to communicate ideas.  Vector and raster based drawing methodologies are introduced and practiced.

 

CAD and Rapid Prototyping (One Semester)

CAD and Rapid Prototyping introduces students to Computer Aided Design using Autodesk Fusion 360.  It integrates rapid prototyping techniques using 3D printers and CNC machines.   

 

CAD II – Architectural Design (One Semester)

CAD II Architectural Design is the second course in the CAD series and introduces students to the basic terminology, concepts, and principles of architectural design. Emphasis is placed on building design, floor plans, roof designs, elevations (interior and exterior), schedules, and foundations.  The course will use Autodesk Revit® Architecture software and students will be required to obtain a User Autodesk certification.

 

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (One Semester)

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering introduces students to Newtonian mechanics and its applications.  It covers statics, dynamics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics.  The course emphasizes hands-on experimentation.

 

Mechanical Systems (One Semester)

Mechanical systems introduces students to the design and construction of microprocessor controlled mechanical systems (i.e. robotics).  The course is entirely lab based.

 

Introduction to Electrical Engineering (One Semester)

Introduction to Electrical Engineering introduces students to electromagnetism and its applications.  It covers electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism, and electromagnetism.  The course emphasizes hands-on experimentation.

 

Electrical/Digital Systems (One Semester)

Electrical / Digital systems introduces students to the design and construction of microprocessor controlled systems.  The course is entirely lab based reinforcing circuit design, microprocessor programming, and digital control logic.

 

Python Programming

Introduction to Computer Science introduces students with little or no programming experience to the art of computational problem solving using the Python programming language. It provides students with skills that will enable them to make productive use of computational techniques, including some of the tools and techniques of “data science” for using computation to model and interpret data. The course does not require knowledge of mathematics beyond Algebra 1, but does assume that students are comfortable with rigorous thinking and not intimidated by mathematical concepts.   

 

AP Computer Science

The AP Computer Science A course is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using the Java language.

ADDITIONAL COURSES

Physical Education/Health

The state of Georgia requires each high school student to complete one semester of physical education and one semester of health. FCS recommends completing this requirement during the freshman year.  PE involves exposure to and training in several different “life sports,” while health covers various aspects of a healthy lifestyle, including nutrition, first aid, etc.

 

Paladin Ambassadors (11th and 12th Grade)

This course is a nontraditional leadership class that helps students understand the skills necessary to be successful in today’s business world. These students are servant leaders in the school and hear from successful business leaders from the community. They also serve the advancement department in special events and the admissions department by helping to give tours to prospective parents.  This class has a limited size with an application process that includes a class application, teacher recommendations, and a panel review.

 

Strength Training

This course is designed to introduce the student to weight training, techniques of lifting, the physiological and psychological effects on the body, and to learn the muscles and bones of the body. The student will be provided an actual hands-on experience of lifting, stretching, agility, and endurance. The student will be able to demonstrate various skills, techniques, learn the best safety modes, and learn the terminology to satisfy the basic requirements to carry out the course.

 

Internship (10th, 11th, and 12th Grade)

Student works side by side with a professional to learn a particular career.

 

IT Internship (10th, 11th, and 12th Grade)

Student works side by side with IT department to learn more about a particular IT career.

 

Office Aide

This class allows students to learn and practice the duties of running a business office efficiently.

 

Teacher Aide

This class allows students to observe and assist a teacher with certain tasks.